Thursday, March 30, 2017

“Why Should I Use MyHeritage?” Here’s Why . . . and Why Not

I saw the link to this article in my Twitter feed, and was curious, because I have assiduously avoided MyHeritage ever since they nicked my data without telling me they were doing so, and then wanted to charge me for accessing it.
“Why Should I Use MyHeritage?” Here’s Why . . .GeneaBloggers
and here's why not...
MyHeritage.com — another scam site? | Hayes & Greene family history
You pays your money and you takes your pick.

But the emphasis is on you pays your money.

Monday, March 06, 2017

10 Ways to Search Google for Information that 96% of people don’t Know about

I've read lots of articles on how to use search engines more effectively, but few of them have been as useful as this one.

10 Ways to Search Google for Information That 96% of People Don’t Know About:

1. Either this or that

Sometimes we’re not sure that we’ve correctly remembered the information or the name we need to start our search. But this doesn’t have to be a problem! Simply put in a few potential variations of what you’re looking for, and separate them by typing the “|“ symbol. Instead of this symbol you can also use ”or." Then it’s easy enough to choose the result that makes the most sense.

Saturday, February 11, 2017

This Data Will Make You Question Every Census Record You've Collected

A useful article on interpreting data from censuses. Most of us ignore the "Instructions to Enumerators" and rush on to record the data themselves, but if we do that, the data can easily be misinterpreted. This Data Will Make You Question Every Census Record You've Collected:

At first glance Instructions to Enumerators sounds pretty benign — it certainly doesn’t sound like it should be shaking any foundations. But it turns out that these documents provide some very surprising insights into the data recorded in the US census. The Instructions to Enumerators specified for the census takers what information was to be collected for each census year, how to properly collect that information, what data should be questioned and what data should be excluded. The instructions put much of the information that we often take at face value into a whole new light. They provide a context to the information that could easily change how that information should be read, understood and used.

Monday, January 23, 2017

The New GRO Searchable Database – AncestorCloud Blog

Until a few months ago, if you wanted access to English birth, marriage and death registrations, you had to buy a certificate, which was expensive. A new scheme mkakes it possible to get PDF copies of the original register entries, at least in the case of births and deaths, and there are also better partial indexes available. The New GRO Searchable Database – AncestorCloud Blog:
During November 2016 the GRO trialled the first of 3 pilot schemes, allowing the purchase and emailing of PDF copies including birth records dated 1837-1934 and death records dated 1837-1957. These copies can only be used for research purposes not for official identification purposes as they are not certified. Marriage certificates were not included in this trial. Phase 2 would pilot the delivery of the PDF records within 3 hours, and phase 3 the delivery of PDF copies of civil registration entries that are not held by GRO in a digital format.
For the indexes
To assist in the ordering process a free online searchable database was also introduced. To access this you must register and login into the GRO website. Unlike the original GRO indexes, which many UK based family history researchers are familiar with, these indexes include the mother’s maiden name for most birth registrations prior to 1911, and ages of death prior to 1860. Both of these will be a huge boost for researchers. Sadly, the birth index only goes up to 1915, although the death index continues to 1957. This means that in order to purchase a PDF copy of a post 1915 birth record, the reference details must be found on the FreeBMD website or other partner databases. There is currently no searchable GRO index for marriages.
The linked arti9cle has useful tips on how to use the sire.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

The 13 Reasons You Can't Break Down Your Brick Walls | Family History Daily

The 13 Reasons You Can't Break Down Your Brick Walls | Family History Daily:
Searching for and locating records about our ancestors is seldom a simple process. Of course, we all have those easy-to-find individuals that seem to appear in every single record at just the right time — but many of us spend most of our time searching for those elusive members of our tree that appear to have avoided being recorded on purpose. If you’ve hit a brick wall in your research, check our list of 13 common reasons why people fail to find the genealogy data they’re looking for. These are not the only reasons a person might hit a brick wall, but in the vast majority of cases one or more of these observations apply. If you feel that something on the list describes your research, take the time to address it and you might find that you tear down your family history obstacle once and for all.
Blogged for future reference!